The American Computer Museum is a museum of the history of computing located in Bozeman, Montana, USA.

It was founded in May 1990 by Barbara and George Keremedjiev as a non-profit organization.

The museum was originally intended to have been located in Princeton, New Jersey, but the location was changed when the founders moved to Bozeman.

It is likely the oldest extant museum dedicated to the history of computers in the world. The Computer Museum in Boston opened first, but it closed in 1999.

The museum's mission is:

"To collect, preserve, interpret, and display the artifacts and history of the information age."

 

Some of the permanent exhibits
- Brains & Thinking Machines - A comprehensive exhibit on Artificial Intelligence, Robotics & Automation
- The Age of American Optimism - 1939-1969: The technologies and popular science fiction cultural expectations of America
- A reconstruction of the Antikythera mechanism, an ancient Greek analogue computer and orrery used to predict astronomical positions and eclipses for calendar and astrological purposes decades in advance, and for tracking the four-year cycle of athletic games
- The Cal Tech: The First Successful Electronic Handheld Calculator prototype & the First Original Pocket Calculator prototype
- The Apple 1 & the Altair: A unique exhibit on the history and origins of Apple Inc. with a focus on Steve Wozniak and Steve Jobs, the Apple I Computer and numerous other historic Apple artifacts, documents and photographs - Plus an Altair Computer and an original January 1975 Popular Electronics Magazine announcing the Altair signed by Ed Roberts, Bill Gates, Paul Allen & Monte Davidoff
- 1,700 Years of Women in Science & Technology (original documents and autographed items from Lavoisier, Lovelace, Currie, Goodall, Franklin, Ride, etc.)
- Wired & Wireless Communications (earliest telephones, phonographs, cell and smart phones, radios, televisions, etc.)
- Texting from the Babylonians through the Telegraph (including a Gutenberg Press reconstruction)
- Internet History, Miniaturization and a Comparison of an Actual Human Brain & a Personal Computer
- Four Generations of Computers Using Relays, Vacuum Tubes, Transistors and Chips
- Personal Computers and Video Games
- Weaving Looms to Punched Cards to Software